1-20 of 8228
Sort by
Journal Article
Jiabei Liu and others
Database, Volume 2024, 2024, baae033, https://doi.org/10.1093/database/baae033
Published: 15 May 2024
Journal Article
Alberto García S. and others
Database, Volume 2024, 2024, Page 0, https://doi.org/10.1093/database/baae034
Published: 15 May 2024
Image
Published: 15 May 2024
Figure 4. Significant topological features of prognostic markers. We compared the topological value of the known prognostic RNAs with that of the random RNAs. ( A ) The normalized closeness was compared with that of random. The raw (B) and normalized ( C ) degree of prognostic lncRNAs was compared with that o
Image
Published: 15 May 2024
Figure 3. A schematic representation of the data curation process used to generate the CardioHotspots database.
Image
Published: 15 May 2024
Figure 4. Hotspots distribution per gene.
Image
Published: 15 May 2024
Figure 6. Distribution articles per gene.
Image
Published: 15 May 2024
Figure 9. Example of the table displayed on the ‘Hotspots’ page.
Image
Published: 15 May 2024
Figure 3. Functional enrichment of prognostic markers. We performed the functional enrichment of the known prognostic RNAs in biological processes of Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway. The significant terms were ranked according to the number of prognostic markers.
Image
Published: 15 May 2024
Figure 2. A schematic representation of the data collection process used to collect the set of potentially relevant articles.
Image
Published: 15 May 2024
Figure 5. Article processing results.
Image
Published: 15 May 2024
Figure 7. CardioHotSpots user interface (UI) showing genes with hotspots.
Image
Published: 15 May 2024
Figure 8. CardioHotspots ProteinViewer.
Image
Published: 15 May 2024
Figure 1. Basic statistics of the curated prognostic markers. (A) Most frequently reported prognostic markers. (B) The journals with the top number of prognostic markers. Figure 1. Visual representation of cancer diagnosis, showcasing popular prognostic markers and leading journals.
Image
Published: 15 May 2024
Figure 2. A schematic workflow of PMBC.
Image
Published: 15 May 2024
Figure 5. CeRNA network of prognostic markers. The blue nodes represent mRNAs, the orange nodes represent lncRNAs and the dark gold nodes represent pseudogenes. The node size is proportional to its degree in the ceRNA network.
Image
Published: 15 May 2024
Figure 1. Conceptual model of CardioHotspots.
Journal Article
Marija Orlic-Milacic and others
Database, Volume 2024, 2024, baae031, https://doi.org/10.1093/database/baae031
Published: 07 May 2024
Image
Published: 07 May 2024
Figure 2. Disease variant-associated disease reactions in Reactome pathway diagrams. (A) Automated overlay of a LOF reaction ‘Defective DAXX does not bind ATRX’ (upper panel) onto normal reaction ‘ATRX binds DAXX’ (bottom panel) ( 28 ). (B) Automated overlay of GOF reactions showing phosphorylation of nuclear
Image
Published: 07 May 2024
Figure 5. Overlap of Reactome disease variant genes with (A) COSMIC Cancer Gene Census genes, (B) OMIM disease genes, (C) ClinGen disease genes and (D) COSMIC, OMIM and ClinGen combined. Overlapping COSMIC/Reactome, ClinGen/Reactome and COSMIC/ClinGen/OMIM/Reactome genes are shown. A single disease gene prese
Image
Published: 07 May 2024
Figure 6. Alignment of Reactome disease variant annotations with ACMG/AMP-specified criteria. (A) PS3 variants are annotated as members of disease variant sets. Cancer variant p16INK4 A20P, unable to bind to and inhibit cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6, is annotated as a member of the ‘p16INK4A LoF muta